Hasegawa, Kakugyo
(?1541-?1646)
   A sixteenth-century ascetic devoted to the religious ascent of Mt. Fuji (see Fuji-ko). He is claimed as the original founder or inspiration of both Fuso-kyo and Jikko-kyo. The name Kakugyo means 'block-ascesis'—i.e. the ascetic discipline of standing for long periods on a block of wood in order to build up a store of power to enable communion with the kami. Hasegawa practised this discipline in the crater of Mt. Fuji and was credited with healing powers. According to legend he once gave Tokugawa, Ieyasu shelter on the mountain. He taught devotion to Sengen Dainichi, the kami-buddha deity of Mt. Fuji of the type 'separated' in the Meiji restoration. Two main lineages developed after his death, one an austere ascetic tradition and the other (Mirokuha) teaching that lay people could combine spiritual practice with daily life.

A Popular Dictionary of Shinto. .

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  • Fuso-kyo —    One of the thirteen groups of sect Shinto (kyoha shinto). Fuso is a name for Japan. The original inspiration of Fuso kyo is said to be Hasegawa, Kakugyo (1541 1646) a devotee of the religious ascent of Mt. Fuji but the person usually regarded… …   A Popular Dictionary of Shinto

  • Jikko-kyo —     Practice Teaching . One of the thirteen sects of kyoha shinto. It developed out of a lay mountain religion tradition founded in the early eighteenth century by Ito, Jikigyo who regarded himself as an incarnation of the bosatsu Miroku. Ito s… …   A Popular Dictionary of Shinto

  • Fuji-ko —    A sect, popular in the Tokugawa period, devoted to the climbing of Mt. Fuji. It was founded in the early sixteenth century by Hasegawa, Takematsu (known as Kakugyo). It was one of more than 800 Fuji sects. See e.g. Fuso kyo, Jikko kyo …   A Popular Dictionary of Shinto

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