Sanshu no shinki
   The three imperial regalia. Literally, the three divine receptacles. In the Nihongi they are referred to as the three treasures (mikusa-no-takara-mono). They are the mirror (yata no kagami) preserved at Ise jingu, the sword (ame-no-muraku-mono-tsurugi, kusanagi no tsurugi) at Atsuta jingu, and the string of jewels (yasakani no magatama) kept at the imperial palace. Replicas of the first two are kept with the third in the Kashiko dokoro shrine of the imperial palace in Tokyo, since possession of the 'three sacred treasures' is held to be evidence of the legitimacy of the emperor. The regalia are kept hidden. The mirror is enclosed in numerous boxes and wrappings, the sword is said to be about 33 inches long and enclosed in wood in a stone box. Nothing is publicly known about the shape or colour of the jewels which are also kept concealed. The regalia are piously believed to have been handed down from Amaterasu to Ninigi then down through the generations of emperors. The divine transmission is not mentioned in the Kojiki or Nihongi, though the legendary emperors Chuai (192-200) and Keitai (507-31) are according to the Nihongi ceremonially presented with a mirror, sword and jewels, or in the case of Keitai an 'imperial signet'. The sword was lost by Emperor Antoku in the defeat of the Taira clan in 1185, two years after the rival emperor Go-Toba had acceded to the throne without the regalia. Following these inauspicious events the successful Minamoto regime at Kamakura placed much greater emphasis on the proper transmission of the imperial regalia as necessary elements in the accession ceremony. There are various interpretations of the meaning of the regalia. At one level they can be seen as charms or protective amulets as well as symbols of legitimacy, but with the rise of Ise or Watarai Shinto allegorical meanings with a strong Buddhist-Confucian flavour were attributed to the three treasures, such as that the mirror signifies truthfulness, the sword wisdom or courage and the jewels benevolence.

A Popular Dictionary of Shinto. .

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Yata no kagami —    The mirror (kagami) of Amaterasu o mi kami which is one of the three imperial regalia (sanshu no shinki). The etymology is unknown but yata is connected with eight . Various sources record that the legendary emperor Sujin in the first century… …   A Popular Dictionary of Shinto

  • Japanische Throninsignien — Die Throninsignien Japans sind die drei geheiligten Schätze, japanisch: Sanshu no Jingi (三種の神器). Es handelt sich dabei um drei Artefakte: das Schwert Kusanagi (草薙剣), einen Edelstein Yasakani no magatama (八尺瓊曲玉) und einen Spiegel, den Yata no… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Kusanagi — Die Throninsignien Japans sind die drei geheiligten Schätze, japanisch: Sanshu no Jingi (三種の神器). Es handelt sich dabei um drei Artefakte: das Schwert Kusanagi (草薙剣), einen Edelstein Yasakani no magatama (八尺瓊曲玉) und einen Spiegel, den Yata no… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Throninsignien Japans — künstlerische Interpretation der Throninsignien Japans Die Throninsignien Japans sind drei geheiligte Schätze (jap. 三種の神器, Sanshu no Jingi oder auch Mikusa no Kandakara) genannt. Es handelt sich dabei um drei Artefakte: das Schwert Kusanagi (草薙剣 …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Shinto — Shintoist, n., adj. /shin toh/, n. 1. Also, Shintoism. the native religion of Japan, primarily a system of nature and ancestor worship. adj. 2. Also, Shintoistic. of, pertaining to, or characteristic of Shinto. [ < Japn shinto, earlier shintau <… …   Universalium

  • Atsuta jingu —    A major chokusai sha shrine in Nagoya, nowadays popular for hatsu mode visits. Among the enshrined kami is the sacred sword, ame no muraku mono tsurugi or kusanagi no tsurugi, one of the three imperial regalia (sanshu no shinki). The shrine… …   A Popular Dictionary of Shinto

  • Kashiko-dokoro —    One of the three main shrines (the others are Korei den and Shinden) in the grounds of the imperial palace, now in Tokyo. It contains the sacred mirror and replicas of the other imperial regalia (sanshu no shinki) as well as guardian kami of… …   A Popular Dictionary of Shinto

  • Ichijo, Kaneyoshi (or Kanera) — (1402 1481)    A court official and pre eminent classical scholar of his time who instructed the influential poet and courtier Sanjonishi, Sanetaka in court ritual during the disturbed period of the Onin war. Around 1470 he wrote a treatise based …   A Popular Dictionary of Shinto

  • Shin-po —    Sacred treasures. It refers to treasures which are kept in the honden or homotsu den (treasure hall) of a shrine and regarded as the belongings of the kami. The treasures, which are likely to be kept securely wrapped and enclosed (cf. sanshu… …   A Popular Dictionary of Shinto

Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”