Shichi-fuku-jin
   Seven good-luck gods. The seven gods of good fortune. Of widely different origins, they are commonly represented sitting together in a treasure boat to symbolise coming prosperity and are particularly popular at new year. They are: Ebisu, Daikoku-ten, Bishamonten, Fuku-roku-ju, Jurojin, Ben-zai-ten, Hotei. The shishi-fuku-jin mai, a comic New Year's dance with participants wearing masks of the seven gods is held in several parts of Fukushima, north-eastern Japan in mid-January. There are several pilgrimage routes based on the shichifukujin taking in Shinto shrines and Buddhist temples.

A Popular Dictionary of Shinto. .

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  • Shichi-fuku-jin — ▪ Japanese deities       (Japanese: “Seven Gods of Luck”), group of seven popular Japanese deities, all of whom are associated with good fortune and happiness. The seven are drawn from various sources but have been grouped together from at least… …   Universalium

  • Shichi-fuku-jin — Sept Divinités du Bonheur Les Shichi fukujin Les Sept Divinités du Bonheur (七福神, Shichi Fukujin …   Wikipédia en Français

  • Fuku-roku-ju —    One of the shichi fuku jin, a Taoist god of popularity, his name means happiness wealth longevity. He is believed to have been a Chinese hermit of the Sung dynasty and is represented as a small elderly man with a long bald head. He is… …   A Popular Dictionary of Shinto

  • Fukurokuju — ▪ Japanese mythology also called  Fukurokujin   (from Japanese fuku, “happiness”; roku, “wealth”; and ju, “longevity”), in Japanese mythology, one of the Shichi fuku jin (Seven Gods of Luck). He represents longevity and wisdom. Like Jurōjin,… …   Universalium

  • Benten — ▪ Japanese mythology also called  Benzaiten   (Japanese: Divinity of the Reasoning Faculty), in Japanese mythology, one of the Shichi fuku jin (Seven Gods of Luck); the Buddhist patron goddess of literature and music, of wealth, and of femininity …   Universalium

  • Bishamon — ▪ Japanese god also called  Bishamonten        in Japanese mythology, one of the Shichi fuku jin (“Seven Gods of Luck”). He is identified with the Buddhist guardian of the north, known as Kubera, or Vaiśravaṇa. Bishamon is always depicted as… …   Universalium

  • Daikoku — ▪ Japanese deity  in Japanese mythology, one of the Shichi fuku jin (Seven Gods of Luck); the god of wealth and guardian of farmers. He is depicted in legend and art as dark skinned, stout, carrying a wish granting mallet in his right hand, a bag …   Universalium

  • Ebisu — ▪ Japanese mythology  in Japanese mythology, one of the Shichi fuku jin (“Seven Gods of Luck”), the patron of fishermen and tradesmen. He is depicted as a fat, bearded, smiling fisherman often carrying a rod in one hand and a tai (sea bream i.e …   Universalium

  • Jurōjin — ▪ Japanese mythology       in Japanese mythology, one of the Shichi fuku jin (“Seven Gods of Luck”), particularly associated with longevity. He is supposed, like Fukurokuju, another of the seven with whom he is often confused, to have once lived… …   Universalium

  • Hakata Dontaku —    The dontaku matsuri at Hakata (Fukuoka, northern Kyushu). Dontaku is a corruption of the Dutch Zontag or Sunday, explained by the fact that Hakata is not far from Nagasaki where the Dutch maintained a trading station throughout the Edo period… …   A Popular Dictionary of Shinto

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