Shinto Directive
   The Shinto Directive (in Japanese translation shinto shirei) was a short document produced, under the direction of the American William K.Bunce, by the Religions Division of the Civil Information and Education Section, Supreme Commander of Allied Powers (SCAP) on 15 December 1945. On behalf of the occupation forces it prohibited in any publicly-funded or government institution not only Shinto doctrines and practices but also the 'militaristic and ultranationalistic ideology' of any religion or creed which asserted the superiority of the Emperor or the people of Japan (see Kokka Shinto). As a result of the various provisions of the Directive Shrine Shinto was placed on the same footing as Sect Shinto or any other religion 'in so far as it may in fact be the philosophy or religion of Japanese individuals'. The Jinja Honcho was set up in response to this directive in order to reconstitute the national network of shrines on a voluntary basis.

A Popular Dictionary of Shinto. .

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  • Shinto shirei —    Japanese term for the Shinto Directive …   A Popular Dictionary of Shinto

  • Kokka Shinto —    A Japanese term used to translate the English state Shinto . Unlike for example shuha shinto which was an administrative term used by the Japanese authorities to define and control certain Japanese religious groups, kokka shinto was a concept… …   A Popular Dictionary of Shinto

  • Jinja shinto —     Shrine Shinto . One of a number of modern academic terms used in both the administration and analysis of Shinto (see Kokka Shinto, Kyoha Shinto, Minzoku shinto etc.). In the Shinto Directive it was one of the synonyms of state Shinto . It has …   A Popular Dictionary of Shinto

  • Staats-Shinto — Der 1912 20 nach der Ideologie des Staats Shintō errichtete Meiji Schrein Der Staats Shintō (国家神道 kokka shintō) war im engeren Sinn der von der Meiji Zeit bis zur Niederlage im Zweiten Weltkrieg in Japan von der Regierung als Staatsideologie… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Staats-Shintō — Der 1912 20 nach der Ideologie des Staats Shintō errichtete Meiji Schrein Der Staats Shintō (jap. 国家神道, kokka shintō) war im engeren Sinn der von der Meiji Restauration bis zur Niederlage im Zweiten Weltkrieg in Japan von der Regierung als… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Association of Shinto Shrines — The Nihongo|Association of Shinto Shrines|神社本庁|Jinja Honchō is a religious administrative organization that oversees about 80,000 Shinto shrines in Japan. These shrines take the Ise Shrine as the foundation of their belief.The Association has… …   Wikipedia

  • Jinja Honcho —    Usually translated into English as The Association of Shinto Shrines or The Shrine Association , Jinja Honcho is the present co ordinating or governing body for most of shrine Shinto (jinja shinto). The word honcho actually means not… …   A Popular Dictionary of Shinto

  • SCAP —    Supreme Command Allied Powers. The name of the largely American postwar Occupation administration (1945 51). Changes were brought about by the occupying powers in this period in many areas of Japanese life. Legislation on religion profoundly… …   A Popular Dictionary of Shinto

  • Ise Jingu —    or Ise no jingu, Ise Daijingu. The Ise Shrine or Grand Shrine of Ise in Mie prefecture south west of Nara by the Isuzu river. It comprises two shrine complexes; the Kotai Jingu or Naiku (Inner Shrine) of Amaterasu and the Toyouke Daijingu or… …   A Popular Dictionary of Shinto

  • Yasukuni Jinja —    The Yasukuni (the name means pacification of the country) Shrine was constructed after the Meiji Restoration to enshrine the 7,751 spirits of those loyalists who had died during battles related to the restoration. It was first known (until… …   A Popular Dictionary of Shinto

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