Shinto kaiga
   Shinto paintings. Shinto seems originally to have been aniconic, the kami having no fixed forms around which iconography could develop. Iconic representations including paintings and statues (see Shinzo) appeared as a result of Buddhist influence and largely represent the combinatory tradition (shinbutsu shugo) which locates the kami within a Buddhist world-view. Paintings include portraits of deified humans such as Sugawara, Michizane (tenjin) and kami in a variety of forms such as old men, women, Buddhist priests and children. Pictures of kami as human-like figures are also found in post-Meiji popular Shinto art such as scroll paintings. In some cases paintings have become shintai. Shrines were classically depicted in two ways. The paintings known as suika-ga are essentially landscapes which show shrines as the beautiful dwelling-places of local kami. Probably the best-known example is a painting of the Nachi waterfall at Kumano. In a different category of art are the honji-suijaku-ga (or suijaku-ga) which are mandara (mandalas) replete with symbolism depicting the shrine-temple complexes as Buddhist 'pure lands' peopled with bosatsu (honji, basic essence) and kami (suijaku, trace manifestations). Outstanding examples of such paintings are preserved from the Kasuga, Ise, Sanno (Hie), Atsuta, Kitano, Kumano and other shrine complexes.

A Popular Dictionary of Shinto. .

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Shinzo —    Kami statues. Shinzo (divine images) can also mean paintings of kami (see Shinto kaiga). Statues of kami developed as a result of Buddhist influences there is no evidence of kami being represented in statues before the introduction of Buddhist …   A Popular Dictionary of Shinto

  • Bosatsu —    = Bodhisattva (Sanskrit). The Buddhist bosatsu is an embodiment, visible or invisible, of the highest ideal of Mahayana Buddhism and is for all practical purposes indistinguishable in character from the various Mahayana ( great vehicle )… …   A Popular Dictionary of Shinto

  • National Treasures of Japan — For the informal term of Preservers of Important Intangible Cultural Properties, see Living National Treasures of Japan …   Wikipedia

  • Tesoro Nacional de Japón — …   Wikipedia Español

  • Bun-rei — Shintai (jap. 神体; auch 御神体, go shintai; shintai ist die sinojapanische Lesung des Wortes mitama shiro, das auch oft verwendet wird; auch yori shiro) sind materielle Gegenstände, die in Shintō Schreinen die Rolle von Reliquien spielen, da sie als… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Bunrei — Shintai (jap. 神体; auch 御神体, go shintai; shintai ist die sinojapanische Lesung des Wortes mitama shiro, das auch oft verwendet wird; auch yori shiro) sind materielle Gegenstände, die in Shintō Schreinen die Rolle von Reliquien spielen, da sie als… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Go-shintai — Shintai (jap. 神体; auch 御神体, go shintai; shintai ist die sinojapanische Lesung des Wortes mitama shiro, das auch oft verwendet wird; auch yori shiro) sind materielle Gegenstände, die in Shintō Schreinen die Rolle von Reliquien spielen, da sie als… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Goshintai — Shintai (jap. 神体; auch 御神体, go shintai; shintai ist die sinojapanische Lesung des Wortes mitama shiro, das auch oft verwendet wird; auch yori shiro) sind materielle Gegenstände, die in Shintō Schreinen die Rolle von Reliquien spielen, da sie als… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Mitama-shiro — Shintai (jap. 神体; auch 御神体, go shintai; shintai ist die sinojapanische Lesung des Wortes mitama shiro, das auch oft verwendet wird; auch yori shiro) sind materielle Gegenstände, die in Shintō Schreinen die Rolle von Reliquien spielen, da sie als… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Mitamashiro — Shintai (jap. 神体; auch 御神体, go shintai; shintai ist die sinojapanische Lesung des Wortes mitama shiro, das auch oft verwendet wird; auch yori shiro) sind materielle Gegenstände, die in Shintō Schreinen die Rolle von Reliquien spielen, da sie als… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”