Yama-no-kami
   Mountain-kami. One meaning is a mountain deity worshipped by those whose work takes them into mountain areas (traditionally hunters, charcoal-burners and woodcutters), in which case the deity is identified with Oyama-tsumi or Kono-hana-saku-ya-hime. Another meaning is the kami of agriculture and growth who descends from the mountain and is worshipped as ta-no-kami or kami of the rice fields.

A Popular Dictionary of Shinto. .

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Yama-no-Kami — Yama no Kami(山の神) is the name given to a kami of the mountains in the Shinto religion of Japan. These can be of two different types. The first type is a god of the mountains who is worshipped by hunters, woodcutters, and charcoal burners. The… …   Wikipedia

  • Yama-no-kami — ▪ Japanese religion       in Japanese popular religion, any of numerous gods of the mountains. These kami are of two kinds: (1) gods who rule over mountains and are venerated by hunters, woodcutters, and charcoal burners and (2) gods who rule… …   Universalium

  • Ōyamatsumi no kami — Ōyamatsumi (jap. オオヤマツミ (Kojiki: 大山津見神; Nihonshoki: 大山祇〔神〕); von Karl Florenz übersetzt mit „Großer Berg Herr“) ist der oberste Berg Kami des Shintō, der entstand, als Izanagi und Izanami nach den Flüssen und Seen die Landmassen gebaren. Einer… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Ta-no-kami —    The kami of the rice fields, i.e. kami of agriculture, known throughout Japan under different regional names; in Tohoku nogami, in Nakano and Yamanashi sakugami, in the Kyoto Osaka area tsukuri kami, in the Inland Sea area jigami, in Kyushu… …   A Popular Dictionary of Shinto

  • Hi-no-kami — Kagutsuchi (jap. カグツチ (Kojiki: Kagu tsuchi no kami (迦具土神), Kagutsuchi no mikoto, Hinoyagihayao no kami; Nihonshoki: Kagu tsuchi no mikoto (軻遇突智 (命)), Ho musuhi; weitere Namen siehe unten) ist der Kami des Feuers in der Mythologie des Shintō.… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Hi no kami — Kagutsuchi (jap. カグツチ (Kojiki: Kagu tsuchi no kami (迦具土神), Kagutsuchi no mikoto, Hinoyagihayao no kami; Nihonshoki: Kagu tsuchi no mikoto (軻遇突智 (命)), Ho musuhi; weitere Namen siehe unten) ist der Kami des Feuers in der Mythologie des Shintō.… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Ō-yama-tsu-mi-no-kami — Ōyamatsumi (jap. オオヤマツミ (Kojiki: 大山津見神; Nihonshoki: 大山祇〔神〕); von Karl Florenz übersetzt mit „Großer Berg Herr“) ist der oberste Berg Kami des Shintō, der entstand, als Izanagi und Izanami nach den Flüssen und Seen die Landmassen gebaren. Einer… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Kura-okami-no-kami — Kuraokami (jap. クラオカミ; Kojiki: 闇淤加美〔神〕, Nihonshoki: 闇龗〔神〕, auch: Kura okami no kami; Karl Florenz vermutet als treffende Übersetzung „dunkler großer Gott“ oder „Großer Gott der Talschluchten“) ist in der Mythologie des Shintō einer der Kami, die… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Yama-miya —    Mountain shrine. A shrine established on the summit or side of a mountain where the mountain is regarded as the kami or its shintai. The yamamiya may also be called the okumiya as opposed to a satomiya more conveniently located. The yamamiya… …   A Popular Dictionary of Shinto

  • Ō-yama-tsu-mi — Ōyamatsumi (jap. オオヤマツミ (Kojiki: 大山津見神; Nihonshoki: 大山祇〔神〕); von Karl Florenz übersetzt mit „Großer Berg Herr“) ist der oberste Berg Kami des Shintō, der entstand, als Izanagi und Izanami nach den Flüssen und Seen die Landmassen gebaren. Einer… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”